RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2018

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264 CoDesRes: CoDesigning for resilience in rural development through P2P networks and STEAM place-based learning interventions
Convenor(s) Anita McKeown (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Chair(s) Anita McKeown (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Timetable Friday 31 August 2018, Session 1 (09:00 - 10:40)
Room Main Building - Small Chemistry Lecture Theatre
Session abstract In 2016, the World Economic Forum at Davos discussed the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, where it was internationally recognised that it can no longer be ‘business as usual’, given the projected 15 years to achieve the transformative change necessary for the well-being of human kind (Mueller, 2016). The complex and interconnected global challenges we face demand alternative strategies. This must include systemic approaches (Gawande, 2014) that focus on an overarching ethos of change, which guides the implementation of any strategies. Further, not only will this require international top-level political commitment but the collective effort of all people, and the engagement of all actors, at all levels. Developing a multi-stakeholder approach is critical if we are to develop innovative systemic methods with any long-term actions requiring ownership, capacity, and consensus at all levels and across all sectors (Mueller, 2016).

Research studies justify tackling sustainability challenges at the local level (UN 2014; Atkinson, 2002; Beatley and Manning, 1997) owing to manageable, tangible scales of governance more readily identifiable by citizens. Maurice Strong, the Secretary General of United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (1992 Rio Earth Summit) stated that local government should lead the way, an idea quickly enshrined in local Agenda 21 frameworks and reminiscent of early ‘thinking globally, acting locally’ (Dubos, 1972) initiatives. If we are to adopt a ‘beyond-compliance’ culture, then the need for ‘culturally situated local approaches that include multiple worldviews and a systemic design thinking perspective that integrates science’ and technology (Mckeown, 2018) offers a fertile research opportunity.

Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency Ireland, the CoDesRes project utilises a unique art and design critical praxis that develops sustainable communities through a focus on circular economies, waste as resource and engagement with marine and coastal plastic pollution implementing the following Sustainable Development Goals 4,11,14 and 15.

Based on the Iveragh peninsula CoDesRes offers insights into methods of encouraging community engagement with international agendas at the local level. The panel presents an interdisciplinary project from the perspectives of an artist / scholar, two Marine Biologists working in different contexts, an Engineer.
Contact the conference organisers to request a change to session or paper details: ac2018@rgs.org
CoDesRes: CoDesigning for resilience in rural development through P2P networks and STEAM place-based learning interventions
Anita McKeown (University College Dublin, Ireland)
In 2016, the World Economic Forum at Davos discussed the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, where it was internationally recognised that it can no longer be ‘business as usual’, given the projected 15 years to achieve the transformative change necessary for the well-being of human kind (Mueller, 2016). The complex and interconnected global challenges we face demand alternative strategies. This must include systemic approaches (Gawande, 2014) that focus on an overarching ethos of change, which guides the implementation of any strategies. Further, not only will this require international top-level political commitment but the collective effort of all people, and the engagement of all actors, at all levels. Developing a multi-stakeholder approach is critical if we are to develop innovative systemic methods with any long-term actions requiring ownership, capacity, and consensus at all levels and across all sectors (Mueller, 2016).

Research studies justify tackling sustainability challenges at the local level (UN 2014; Atkinson, 2002; Beatley and Manning, 1997) owing to manageable, tangible scales of governance more readily identifiable by citizens. Maurice Strong, the Secretary General of United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (1992 Rio Earth Summit) stated that local government should lead the way, an idea quickly enshrined in local Agenda 21 frameworks and reminiscent of early ‘thinking globally, acting locally’ (Dubos, 1972) initiatives. If we are to adopt a ‘beyond-compliance’ culture, then the need for ‘culturally situated local approaches that include multiple worldviews and a systemic design thinking perspective that integrates science’ and technology (Mckeown, 2018) offers a fertile research opportunity.

Funded by the Environmental Protection Agency Ireland, the CoDesRes project utilises a unique art and design critical praxis that develops sustainable communities through a focus on circular economies, waste as resource and engagement with marine and coastal plastic pollution implementing the following Sustainable Development Goals 4,11,14 and 15.

Based on the Iveragh peninsula CoDesRes offers insights into methods of encouraging community engagement with international agendas at the local level. The panel presents an interdisciplinary project from the perspectives of an artist / scholar, two Marine Biologists working in different contexts, an Engineer.
Inclusive design for land stewardship: Community engagement in coastal biodiversity management through p2p networks
Eleanor Turner (University College Dublin, Ireland)
The importance of conserving biodiversity has long been discussed in scientific literature; the conservation of biodiversity being fundamental to the function of an ecosystem (Gaston and Spicer, 1998, Schwartz et al., 2000), and so preserving an ecosystem requires an understanding of the biodiversity inherent to that system (Secretariat of the Convention on Biological diversity, 2004). More recent trends in biodiversity conservation seek to attribute a monetary value on ecosystem services (Beaumont et al., 2008), ecosystem services being “the ecological outputs that contribute to human wellbeing” (Bullock, C. and O’ Shea, R., 2013).

This view, along with the movement towards more integrated environmental management systems (Apitz, 2005), such as “Integrated coastal zone management” and “catchment management” for freshwater systems (Clark, 1998), has increased the need for public participation in conservation management projects and created an awareness within communities as stakeholders (Boyden, 2014).

The importance and value of public participation and community led conservation management initiatives are now widely recognised, (Rolston, 2015, Waltner-Toews, 2005). Legislation from the EU in the form of the Water Frameworks Directive also attributes value to public involvement and consultation. This encouragement from both the scientific community and government agencies has led to the emergence of a number of community led conservation projects throughout Ireland (Boyden, 2014).

The area of concern in the scope of my research is the Iveragh peninsula, SW Kerry. The coastline hosts several designated protected areas, both Special areas of Conservation (SAC’s) and Special areas of Protection (SPA’S) the largest of these being the Kenmare river SAC (www.npws.ie). This research focuses on creating pathways of knowledge sharing between and within communities that can be self-sustaining through p2p networks.
Marine Education; influencing youth education through STEAM place-based interventions
Lucy Hunt (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Growing up in a small coastal village; Waterville, Co. Kerry I developed a love and fascination of the sea from a young age. Starting to scuba dive at age 12 the discovery of the beauty and biodiversity of the underwater world inspired an approach to learning more about the sea and its many inhabitants.

By transforming everyone into an explorer and learning about marine diversity through multi-modal and experiential learning, this paper discusses the value of connecting youth with the ocean and developing ocean literacy in new ways.

This paper outlines approaches used to engage learners and discusses the transfer and adaptation of an existing curriculum for 6 – 12 years, originally developed for the Volvo Ocean Yacht Race, 2017 / 8 to engage 15 – 16-year-old students in combination with the projects critical praxis, an arts and design-led approach.

The paper focuses on how this approach could develop youth awareness of the importance of the sea in their lives and the challenges and impacts of pollution made on land collecting at sea and coastlines. As the students understand this situation, the integrated STEAM place-based learning interventions aim to facilitate their opportunities to solve the problems through innovative solutions.
Waste as Resource; embedding circular economies in community contexts through STEAM place-based interventions
Colin Keogh (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Since the early adoptions of 3DP (3DP) technologies in the late 80's, and more significantly by the rep rap movement in 2005, 3DP has become extremely accessible. There are many different new and exciting methods of 3DP but it the increase in accessibility, through low cost and easy to use formats that has seen 3DP’s diffusion across nearly all sectors. There have been astonishing results in medicine, engineering, product design and art, paleontology, archaeology, biomolecular sciences, and even fashion.

This paper presents engineering processes for community and youth engagement within the CoDesRes project, Iveragh Peninsula, SW Kerry. These processes aims to reduce, recycle and re-purpose waste plastic material which currently pollutes our oceans, seas and beaches, through the development and utilization of advanced recycling and manufacturing technology to produce practical daily use, educational and awareness products.

3D printing technology allows the production of a near unlimited range of objects with very small technological barriers to entry. With a focus on STEAM place-based interventions the project explores the circular economy memorandum of the EU commission, through the re-purposing of waste materials by local communities and young people. The paper presents the initial phase of the project including interactions with the other researchers and the various participants and the insights gained for future co-design approaches to research and global challenges.
Discussant
Cara Courage (Tate Exchange)
As Head of Tate Exchange Dr Cara Courage, an experimental space and a programme that looks at the role of and the value that art can play in society will discuss the interactions and dialogue that emerges from such interdisciplinary situated projects. Such projects test new ideas that directly address issues of society; explore artistic practices/processes with the public; and work to create a closer relationship between creative collaborators and mutiple actors.