RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2019

RGS-IBG Logo
Add to my calendar:    Outlook   Google   Hotmail/Outlook.com   iPhone/iPad   iCal (.ics)

Please note that some mobile devices may require third party apps to add appointments to your calendar


243 Urban Studies Lecture: Where and what is auto-constructed now? The afterlives of urban majority districts in the contemporary South
Convenor(s) Julia Macbeth (Urban Studies Journal, UK)
Chair(s) Phil Hubbard (King's College London, UK)
Timetable Thursday 29 August 2019, Session 4 (16:50 - 18:30)
Room RGS-IBG Ondaatje Theatre
Session abstract Recent urban analysis has emphasized “big moves”—planetary scales, extensive processes, major actors, mega-developments, and substantial financial flows. These are important developments in accounting for the driving factors of accelerated and seemingly all encompassing urbanization.

Still, significant volumes of the urban built and social environment have historically been shaped by the collaborative efforts of residents and their associative institutions. These were collaborations largely operating without formal contracts or consensus. These efforts pieced together concrete places that were capable of holding many different practices and sentiments, and as such rarely became sedentary, even if conditions and power relations might have appeared fixed.

In some ways these practices of place making would point ahead to substantial transformations in the conventional forms of urban agency. These forms, at one and the same time, include and exceed clear demarcations of entities--individual, household, social, and network. For example, the operations of the digital media entail practices that are increasingly beyond the apprehension of human cognition, and so it is increasingly unclear as to "who is the what that does something to whom."

As a result the terms and economies of such collaborations among residents--their acts of autoconstruction--become more complex and precarious, particularly as residents emphasize the importance of mobility, flexible commitments, and individual aspirations. Placemaking is increasingly subject to expertise, calculation, and financial value. Still, urban environments are elaborated in ways that are not captivated by plans, measures, or even advanced computational analyses; and there are many ways in which residents continue to operate in concert but without discernible mobilization or organization. Focusing on notions of "popular economy"--not as a specific sector or set of practices, but as a constellation of efforts on the part of different residents and to generate something of value, both folded in and external to predominant capital relations--the lecture explores the new terrain of urban invention by poor, working and lower middle residents in wake of its purported demise.
Contact the conference organisers to request a change to session or paper details: ac2019@rgs.org
Where and what is auto-constructed now? The afterlives of urban majority districts in the contemporary South
AbdouMaliq Simone (University of Sheffield, UK)
Recent urban analysis has emphasized “big moves”—planetary scales, extensive processes, major actors, mega-developments, and substantial financial flows. These are important developments in accounting for the driving factors of accelerated and seemingly all encompassing urbanization.

Still, significant volumes of the urban built and social environment have historically been shaped by the collaborative efforts of residents and their associative institutions. These were collaborations largely operating without formal contracts or consensus. These efforts pieced together concrete places that were capable of holding many different practices and sentiments, and as such rarely became sedentary, even if conditions and power relations might have appeared fixed.

In some ways these practices of place making would point ahead to substantial transformations in the conventional forms of urban agency. These forms, at one and the same time, include and exceed clear demarcations of entities--individual, household, social, and network. For example, the operations of the digital media entail practices that are increasingly beyond the apprehension of human cognition, and so it is increasingly unclear as to "who is the what that does something to whom."

As a result the terms and economies of such collaborations among residents--their acts of autoconstruction--become more complex and precarious, particularly as residents emphasize the importance of mobility, flexible commitments, and individual aspirations. Placemaking is increasingly subject to expertise, calculation, and financial value. Still, urban environments are elaborated in ways that are not captivated by plans, measures, or even advanced computational analyses; and there are many ways in which residents continue to operate in concert but without discernible mobilization or organization. Focusing on notions of "popular economy"--not as a specific sector or set of practices, but as a constellation of efforts on the part of different residents and to generate something of value, both folded in and external to predominant capital relations--the lecture explores the new terrain of urban invention by poor, working and lower middle residents in wake of its purported demise.