RGS-IBG Annual International Conference 2019

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34 Dialogues in Human Geography Lecture: Terrain, Politics, History
Convenor(s) Rob Kitchin (Maynooth University, Ireland)
Chair(s) Jeremy Crampton (Newcastle University, UK)
Timetable Wednesday 28 August 2019, Session 2 (11:10 - 12:50)
Room RGS-IBG Ondaatje Theatre
Session abstract This lecture will attempt to do two things. First, it will continue work using the concept of terrain to analyse the political materiality of territory. This builds on recent work by geographers and others on the vertical, the volumetric, the voluminous and the milieu as ways of thinking space in three-dimensions, of a fluid and dynamic earth. Second, it will begin thinking about the history of the concept of terrain in geographical thought, which has tended to associate it with either physical or military geography. Such work, I will suggest, is a way geographers might begin to respond to the challenge recently made by Bruno Latour, where he suggests that “belonging to a territory is the phenomenon most in need of rethinking and careful redescription; learning new ways to inhabit the Earth is our biggest challenge”. We need, in his terms, to find a way to bring us down to earth, of where to land or ground ourselves, Où atterrir. This lecture will try to think about the relation between territory, earth, land and ground, and their limits.
Contact the conference organisers to request a change to session or paper details: ac2019@rgs.org
Terrain, Politics, History
Stuart Elden (University of Warwick, UK)
Kimberley Peters (University of Liverpool, UK)
Rachael Squire (Royal Holloway, University of London, UK)
Deborah Dixon (University of Glasgow, UK)
This lecture will attempt to do two things. First, it will continue work using the concept of terrain to analyse the political materiality of territory. This builds on recent work by geographers and others on the vertical, the volumetric, the voluminous and the milieu as ways of thinking space in three-dimensions, of a fluid and dynamic earth. Second, it will begin thinking about the history of the concept of terrain in geographical thought, which has tended to associate it with either physical or military geography. Such work, I will suggest, is a way geographers might begin to respond to the challenge recently made by Bruno Latour, where he suggests that “belonging to a territory is the phenomenon most in need of rethinking and careful redescription; learning new ways to inhabit the Earth is our biggest challenge”. We need, in his terms, to find a way to bring us down to earth, of where to land or ground ourselves, Où atterrir. This lecture will try to think about the relation between territory, earth, land and ground, and their limits.